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The Poetry of John Berryman

The Poetry of John Berryman

 

Helen Vendler

 

On October 25, 1914, just over one hundred years ago, the remarkable poet John Berryman was born in McAlester, Oklahoma. The anniversary invites a second look at Berryman’s life, art, and reputation. In honor of this anniversary, Farrar, Straus and Giroux offers The Heart Is StrangeNew Selected Poems and is reissuing The Dream Songs77 Dream Songs, and Berryman’s Sonnets. Both the title and cover of this peculiar Selected Poems obscure the fact that the selection includes not a single poem from Berryman’s most famous work, The Dream Songs. (The publicity notice for the Selected promises “a generous selection from across Berryman’s varied career,” and claims to celebrate “the whole Berryman.”)

Read more from the New York Review of Books: 

An Expanding Universe of Stardust, a Collection from the Hubble Telescope

An Expanding Universe of Stardust, a Collection from the Hubble Telescope

Stardust by Freeman Dyson

 

When we see things for the first time, the pictures are always a surprise. Nature’s imagination is richer than ours. We imagine things to be simple and Nature makes them complicated. In Expanding Universe: Photographs from the Hubble Space Telescope, a magnificent selection of pictures taken by cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope, the big surprise is dust.  We imagined a universe of stars and galaxies gleaming brightly against a black sky. What we see is multicolored patterns of fluid motion, looking like eddies in a river or clouds in a sunset. The patterns are made of dust.

Read more about stardust and the history of the universe here: 

Filmmaker and Artist Hu Jie on China’s Invisible History

 Filmmaker and Artist Hu Jie on China's Invisible History

 

Ian Johnson

Though none of his works have been publicly shown in China, Hu Jie is one of his country’s most noteworthy filmmakers. Specializing in documentary films that explore sensitive parts of contemporary Chinese history, Hu, who is fifty-seven, has created an ambitious oeuvre despite working in some of the most challenging conditions imaginable.

He is best known for his trilogy of documentaries about Maoist China, which includes Searching for Lin Zhao’s Soul(2004), telling the now-legendary story of a young Christian woman who died in prison for refusing to recant her criticisms of the Party during the Anti-Rightist Campaign of 1957; Though I Am Gone (2007), about a teacher who was beaten to death by her own students at the outset of the Cultural Revolution in 1966; and Spark (2013), describing a doomed underground publication in 1960 that tried to expose the Great Leap famine, which killed upward of 30 million people.

Read more about Hu Jie here

 

Noam Chomsky on Russia and the Lies of US Militarism

Noam Chomsky on Russia and the Lies of US Militarism

Earlier this month, Dan Falcone and Saul Isaacson, both high school educators, sat down with Noam Chomsky in his Cambridge, MA office. In a brief conversation, edited and condensed here for clarity, they covered a wide range of topics — the projection of US power abroad and the stories told to justify it; COINTELPRO and domestic repression; the failures of the mainstream media; the West’s posture toward Putin; and much more. As always, we’re happy to publish Professor Chomsky’s invaluable insights…

Read more of The Crimes of Others in Jacobin Magazine

 

The following video clips are a great watch:

 

Noam Chomsky on Black Lives Matter: Why Won’t U.S. Own Up to History of Slavery & Racism?

Chomsky on Snowden & Why NSA Surveillance Doesn’t Stop Terror While the U.S. Drone War Creates It

What Have Vice Presidents after Truman Learned?

What Have Vice Presidents after Truman Learned?

This article recounts how increasingly important it has become for a vice president to learn the trade of potentially becoming president.  This has been especially true after F.D.R.’s demise. It’s a challenging exercise because there is no formal training for the job of president. History has proven that such a lack of experience and leadership can be catastrophic. 

Seventy years ago this week, on April 12, 1945, while he was sitting for a portrait in Warm Springs, Georgia, President Franklin D. Roosevelt spoke what were probably his last words—“I have a terrific headache”—and fainted. He died two hours later, of a cerebral hemorrhage. After F.D.R.’s Vice-President, Harry S. Truman, a former senator from Missouri, got the news at the Capitol, the Secret Service rushed him to the White House, where he was sworn in by Chief Justice Harlan Stone. “I felt as though the moon and the stars and all the planets fell on me last night when I got the news,” Truman told reporters the next day. “I have the most terribly responsible job any man ever had.”

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

 

Pluto’s First Color Portrait

Pluto’s First Color Portrait

Pluto which is technically not a planet anymore is 3 billion miles away from Earth and has an average surface temperature of 200 times below freezing. From the color images from the New Horizons spacecraft, we will be able to see this planet with great detail like never before. 

 

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft just sent back its first color image of the dwarf planet and its largest moon Charon.

The post Pluto’s First Color Portrait From the New Horizons Probe appeared first on WIRED.

How does a Hedge Fund Work

How Does a Hedge Fund Work

Ever wondered when hedge funds began and what their whole brouhaha was all about? This article seems to do just that.  By learning a short history of how these funds have operated, we get a glimpse into the future of the financial world that may be devoid of them.

IN FEBRUARY it emerged that nearly half of the richest hedge fund managers in Britain have donated a total of £10m ($14.8m) to the Conservative party since 2010. Labour, the opposition party, has accused the Tories of dishing out favours, such as a tax loophole, to their “hedge-fund friends”.

Read more about how these funds operate

Mysterious Outbreak of Childhood Paralysis maybe Linked to a Cold Virus

Mysterious Childhood Paralysis Linked to a Cold Virus

The common cold virus from 2014 contains a viral strain that has been linked to many cases of childhood paralysis across America. 

LAST YEAR, HUNDREDS of children across the country got sick with what looked like a common cold. Nothing to worry about: body aches, runny nose, coughing and sneezing. But then, mysteriously, a handful of those kids became paralyzed—first, just in an arm or a leg, and then spreading so far that some children needed a ventilator to breathe. The CDC reports that since August 2014, at least 115 children in 34 states have developed unexplained muscle weakness or paralysis, which they’re now calling acute flaccid myelitis. Doctors have urgently been hunting down the origin of this strange illness for over half a year, and now they think they’ve finally identified the culprit: enterovirus D68

Scientists have confirmed that a polio-like virus called EV-D68 is behind a mysterious outbreak of paralysis in children last year.

 

The post Mysterious Childhood Paralysis Linked to a Cold Virus appeared first on WIRED.

Pope Francis Is Still a Christian, if not a Catholic for some!

Pope Francis Is Still a Christian, if not a Catholic for Some!

This article examines how right wing Christians, particularly extremist catholics distort the very essence of Christianity. 

Garry Wills

At a recent I talk I gave about Pope Francis, a man asked me, “Why do more non-Catholics like the pope than Catholics do?” He was wrong, of course. A Pew poll two months ago found that 90 percent of Catholics like what the pope is doing—and the number is even higher (95 percent) among the most observant, Mass attending Catholics. The percentage of non-Catholics who view the pope favorably does not get above the 70s.

Yet the question was understandable. There is a perception of great resistance to the pope in his own church.

Read more about Pope Francis here 

 

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