News

Putin The Most Powerful Man in the World

Putin The Most Powerful Men in the World Putin has declared victory in his war on modern culture, which gives him the right to call himself the most powerful man in the world. That description has generally been part of the definition of a different job—the one to which Trump has in fact just been elected. One suspects that having two men who believe themselves to be the most powerful in the world can’t go well. Signs of trouble have already appeared.

Mosul Dam, A Bigger Problem Than ISIS?

Mosul Dam, A Bigger Problem Than ISIS?

 

On the morning of August 7, 2014, a team of fighters from the Islamic State, riding in pickup trucks and purloined American Humvees, swept out of the Iraqi village of Wana and headed for the Mosul Dam. Two months earlier, ISIS had captured Mosul, a city of nearly two million people, as part of a ruthless campaign to build a new caliphate in the Middle East. For an occupying force, the dam, twenty-five miles north of Mosul, was an appealing target: it regulates the flow of water to the city, and to millions of Iraqis who live along the Tigris. As the ISIS invaders approached, they could make out the dam’s four towers, standing over a wide, squat structure that looks like a brutalist mausoleum. Getting closer, they saw a retaining wall that spans the Tigris, rising three hundred and seventy feet from the riverbed and extending nearly two miles from embankment to embankment. Behind it, a reservoir eight miles long holds eleven billion cubic metres of water.

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

Related:
The Trump Team’s Holy War and the Remaking of the World Order
The Road from Saddam Hussein to Donald Trump
The Berlin Attack Is Right Out of the Terror Handbooks

The “Honor Killing” of Pakistani Social-Media Star Qandeel Baloch

The “Honor Killing” of  Pakistani Social-Media Star Qandeel Baloch

 

Last August, a twenty-two-second video posted on Facebook went viral in Pakistan. A young woman(Qandeel Baloch), her face obscured by large sunglasses, had recorded herself standing in front of a middle-aged man. “How I’m looking? Tell me how I’m looking,” she says to the man, her gaze never wavering from the camera’s lens. “Marvellous,” he says. “Just marvellous?” she responds, incredulously. “Extraordinary,” he says. The woman’s name was Qandeel Baloch, and her video received nearly a quarter of a million views. For Baloch, it was a breakthrough. In the months that followed, she would post hundreds of videos, racking up millions of views. Just like that, she was famous.

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

Related:
Pakistan’s Troll Problem
An Assassination That Could Bring War Or Peace
A Crisis for Minorities in Pakistan

Why Brexit Might Not Happen at All

Why Brexit Might Not Happen at All

As I noted on Friday, Britain won’t be exiting the E.U. anytime soon. If and when the U.K. government invokes Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty of 2007, which grants member states the right to leave, there will be at least two years of negotiations about the terms of Britain’s future relationship with Europe. And that invocation of Article 50 is likely to be delayed for quite a while.

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

Related:
On Brexit, the 2016 Euro Championship, and Trump
Daily Cartoon: Monday, June 27th
The Day After Brexit

We Buried the Disgraceful Truth About the Afghan and Iraq Wars and PTSD

We Buried the Disgraceful Truth About the Afghan and Iraq Wars and PTSD

What is the real story about the toll of PTSD amongst Veterans of the Afghan and Iraq war?

Since 2001, at least 2.5 million members of the American armed services have deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Among returnees, between 11 and 20 percent are estimated to suffer in any given year from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to the Department of Veteran Affairs. The PTSD label is loosely used, but under the clinical definition of the National Institute of Mental Health, an afflicted person may experience for at least one month a combination of symptoms including flashbacks, bad dreams, guilt, numbness, depression, sleeplessness, angry outbursts, and partial amnesia. The sheer size and diversity of this injured population are astounding.

Read more about PTSD and the truth about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan by Steve Coll for NYRB

The Outsized Life of Muhammad Ali

 

 

 

What a loss to suffer, even if for years you knew it was coming. Muhammad Ali, who died Friday, in Phoenix, at the age of seventy-four, was the most fantastical American figure of his era, a self-invented character of such physical wit, political defiance, global fame, and sheer originality that no novelist you might name would dare conceive him. Born Cassius Clay in Jim Crow-era Louisville, Kentucky, he was a skinny, quick-witted kid, the son of a sign painter and a house cleaner, who learned to box at the age of twelve to avenge the indignity of a stolen bicycle, a sixty-dollar red Schwinn that he could not bear to lose. Eventually, Ali became arguably the most famous person on the planet, known as a supreme athlete, an uncanny blend of power, improvisation, and velocity; a master of rhyming prediction and derision; an exemplar and symbol of racial pride; a fighter, a draft resister, an acolyte, a preacher, a separatist, an integrationist, a comedian, an actor, a dancer, a butterfly, a bee, a figure of immense courage.

See the rest of the story at about Muhammad Ali newyorker.com

 

Seventeen Words That Spelled Trouble for Hillary Clinton

Seventeen Words That Spelled Trouble for Hillary Clinton

 

I’d just posted a lengthy piece on Hillary Clinton’s general-election prospects when a long-awaited report from the State Department’s inspector general, a watchdog appointed by President Obama, was leaked, a day in advance of its release on Thursday. The report concluded that, as Secretary of State, Clinton violated the department’s rules by conducting official business via a private e-mail account and setting up a private e-mail server to handle and store her correspondence.

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

Related:
The Surreal Presidential Debate You Didn’t See: Libertarians in Las Vegas
The Challenges Facing Hillary Clinton
Daily Cartoon: Tuesday, May 24th

James Ridgeway’s Prolific Reporting on Solitary Confinement

James Ridgeway’s Prolific Reporting on Solitary Confinement

James Ridgeway has covered solitary confinement in America unlike any other journalist and runs the Website Solitary Watch. Prison officials rarely allow journalists to walk through their prisons, and even rarer is the warden who lets a reporter into his solitary-confinement unit. The voices of the men and women confined inside these prisons-within-a-prison are often the last ones that any prison administrator wants outsiders to hear. But the potential power of these prisoners’ stories to draw public attention—and propel politicians to act—was on display earlier this week, when President Obama announced a plan to decrease the use of solitary confinement in federal prisons. Obama cited the story of a young man named Kalief Browder, who spent nearly two years in solitary confinement on Rikers Island without having been convicted of a crime.

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

Related:
A Play That Confronts the Horror of Solitary Confinement
Black Wounds Matter
The Case Against Cash Bail

To check out  Solitary Watch click here 

A Selection of James Ridgeway Interviews:


 

Protest by Self Immolation in Tibet

Protest by Self Immolation in Tibet

February 27, 2009, was the third day of Losar, the Tibetan New Year. It was also the day that self-immolation came to Tibet. The authorities had just cancelled a Great Prayer Festival (Monlam) that was supposed to commemorate the victims of the government crackdown in 2008. A monk by the name of Tapey stepped out of the Kirti Monastery and set his body alight on the streets of Ngawa, in the region known in Tibetan as Amdo, a place of great religious reverence and relevance, now designated as part of China’s Sichuan Province.

At least 145 other Tibetans have self-immolated since then. Of these, 141 did so within Tibet, while the remaining five were living in exile. According to the best information we have, 125 have died (including 122 within Tibet and three abroad). Most of these individuals are men, though some are women. Many were parents who left behind young children. The oldest was sixty-four, and the youngest was sixteen. Seven underage Tibetans have either self-immolated or attempted self-immolation; two of them died, and two were detained and their fate is unknown. The numbers include three monks of high rank (tulkus, or reincarnated masters), along with thirty-nine ordinary monks and eight nuns. But many were ordinary people: seventy-four were nomads or peasants; among the others were high school students, workers, vendors, a carpenter, a woodworker, a writer, a tangka painter, a taxi driver, a retired government cadre, a laundry owner, a park ranger, and three activists exiled abroad. All are Tibetan.

Read more about this protest in Tibet here

From Mumbai to Paris a Familiar Style of Terrorist Attacks

From Mumbai to Paris a Familiar Style of Terrorist Attacks

Much of the ISIS playbook in Paris—the meticulous planning, the selection of soft targets, the multiple simultaneous attacks by different teams used to create a sense of chaos in the streets, the mayhem created—was inspired by the extremist group LET’s attack in Mumbai in 2008. LET’s most important innovation in jihadi warfare is the use of mass attacks on civilian targets.

To read more click here 

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. ...
  10. 21