Science

Herbig Haro Objects Are Like One Cranky Child Star

Herbig Haro Objects Are Like One Cranky Child Star

The post Space Photos of the Week: This Is One Cranky Child Star appeared first on WIRED.

Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter Gets a School Portrait

Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter Gets a School Portrait

Space photos of the week, October 11–17.

The post Space Photos of the Week: Jupiter Gets a School Portrait appeared first on WIRED.


An Expanding Universe of Stardust, a Collection from the Hubble Telescope

An Expanding Universe of Stardust, a Collection from the Hubble Telescope

Stardust by Freeman Dyson

 

When we see things for the first time, the pictures are always a surprise. Nature’s imagination is richer than ours. We imagine things to be simple and Nature makes them complicated. In Expanding Universe: Photographs from the Hubble Space Telescope, a magnificent selection of pictures taken by cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope, the big surprise is dust.  We imagined a universe of stars and galaxies gleaming brightly against a black sky. What we see is multicolored patterns of fluid motion, looking like eddies in a river or clouds in a sunset. The patterns are made of dust.

Read more about stardust and the history of the universe here: 

Pluto’s First Color Portrait

Pluto’s First Color Portrait

Pluto which is technically not a planet anymore is 3 billion miles away from Earth and has an average surface temperature of 200 times below freezing. From the color images from the New Horizons spacecraft, we will be able to see this planet with great detail like never before. 

 

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft just sent back its first color image of the dwarf planet and its largest moon Charon.

The post Pluto’s First Color Portrait From the New Horizons Probe appeared first on WIRED.

Mysterious Outbreak of Childhood Paralysis maybe Linked to a Cold Virus

Mysterious Childhood Paralysis Linked to a Cold Virus

The common cold virus from 2014 contains a viral strain that has been linked to many cases of childhood paralysis across America. 

LAST YEAR, HUNDREDS of children across the country got sick with what looked like a common cold. Nothing to worry about: body aches, runny nose, coughing and sneezing. But then, mysteriously, a handful of those kids became paralyzed—first, just in an arm or a leg, and then spreading so far that some children needed a ventilator to breathe. The CDC reports that since August 2014, at least 115 children in 34 states have developed unexplained muscle weakness or paralysis, which they’re now calling acute flaccid myelitis. Doctors have urgently been hunting down the origin of this strange illness for over half a year, and now they think they’ve finally identified the culprit: enterovirus D68

Scientists have confirmed that a polio-like virus called EV-D68 is behind a mysterious outbreak of paralysis in children last year.

 

The post Mysterious Childhood Paralysis Linked to a Cold Virus appeared first on WIRED.

A Twisted Coronal Mass Ejection

Science Graphic of the Week: Spectacular, Twisted Solar Eruption

Like many stars, the sun is prone to sudden outbursts. Erupting from the star’s surface, these events sometimes sling globs of charged particles and sun-stuff in Earth’s direction. If they’re powerful enough, these coronal mass ejections can produce geomagnetic storms that damage satellites and disrupt power grids.

The post Science Graphic of the Week: Spectacular, Twisted Solar Eruption appeared first on WIRED.



Refer to the original paper published in Nature Magazine about the magnetic environment and coronal mass ejection here: 


What Does Science Accomplish?

Chesley Bonestell: Saturn as Seen from Titan [Its Moon], 1944; from Michael Benson’s Cosmigraphics: Picturing Space Through Time, to be published by Abrams in November. ‘Along with French ­illustrator and astronomer Lucien Rudaux,’ Be

 

Priyamvada Natarajan

 

A recent survey by the National Science Foundation found that a quarter of Americans did not know if the earth moved around the sun or vice versa. Meanwhile, 33 percent of Americans deny the reality of evolution and still believe that humans and the rest of the animal kingdom have always existed in their present form. Americans have extremely high expectations of and confidence in science and technology and think of it as a national priority—yet they also distrust its results. How to explain this?

Read the rest of this great essay by clicking here: 

Scientists Reveal the Hidden City of Angkor Wat

Scientists Reveal the Hidden City of Angkor Wat

 

In the year 802 C.E., the founder of the medieval Khmer empire, Jayavarman II, anointed himself “king of the world.” In laying claim to such a grandiose title, he was a little ahead of his time: It would be another few centuries before the Khmers built Earth’s largest religious monument, Angkor Wat, the crowning glory of a kingdom that stood in what is today northwestern Cambodia. But Jayavarman II had good reason to believe that his nascent kingdom, in the sacred Kulen hills northeast of Angkor, was a record-holder. Airborne laser scanning technology, or LiDAR, has revealed the imprint of a vast urban landscape hidden in the Kulen’s jungle and in the lowlands surrounding Angkor Wat; by the 13th century, the low-density cityscape covered an area of about 1,000 square kilometers.

Read more about this amazing discovery

Japanese Firm Obayashi Construction to Build Space Elevator

Japanese Firm Obayashi Construction to Build Space Elevator

Once the realm of science fiction, a Japanese company has announced they will have a space elevator up and running by the year 2050.

If successful it would revolutionize the scope of such travel and potentially transform the global economy.

The Japanese construction giant Obayashi says they will build a space elevator that will reach 96,000 kilometres into space.

Read about this amazing engineering feat, which when completed would be able to  transport up to 30 people at a time, for a journey that would last seven days. 

 

The Real Motive Behind India’s Mars Mission

MOM

 

On Wednesday, having travelled four hundred and ten million miles, India’s Mangalyaan probe settled into orbit around Mars. It will linger there for only six months—about a fifth of the time that it took to build the spacecraft and dispatch it to the Red Planet. The orbiter’s scientific agenda appears to be skimpy. It will send back images of a surface that was first photographed up close by the Mariner 4 spacecraft, in 1965, and it will assay the Martian atmosphere for methane, a gas that mystifyingly replenishes itself instead of being broken down by the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Beyond these goals, the orbiter will do little. It is as if the thirty-first scientist to voyage to the Galápagos Islands had stayed only a couple of days, sketched one or two of Darwin’s finches, and then left.

For the Mars orbiter, however, the journey was the thing. “I would say eighty-five per cent of our mission is for technology demonstration,” K. Radhakrishnan, the chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), told the Indian Express.

 

Read more of this article by Samanth Subramanian 

Here are some great videos about India’s recent Mars expedition:

 

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. ...
  10. 18