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Art That Won’t Stop Talking, Manifesto by Julian Rosefeldt

Art That Won’t Stop Talking, Manifesto by Julian RosefeldtJulian Rosefeldt’s installation Manifesto features different characters, each one played by the virtuosic, versatile Cate Blanchett, reciting what Rosefeldt calls “text collages,” which are woven together from different artists’ manifestos under the heading of an artistic movement—Conceptual Art/Minimalism, for instance, or Situationism. The seams between the texts are hard to detect, and the seamlessness suggests something not only about the ways in which ideas and themes reverberate and cycle throughout history, but also about the artifice of historical periodization.

 

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For Julian Rosefeldt official website:

 Julian Rosefeldt: Manifesto Interview:

Henri Cartier- Bresson The Decisive Moment

This is a great documentary where Henry Cartier-Bresson talks about his craft

 


 

Putin The Most Powerful Man in the World

Putin The Most Powerful Men in the World Putin has declared victory in his war on modern culture, which gives him the right to call himself the most powerful man in the world. That description has generally been part of the definition of a different job—the one to which Trump has in fact just been elected. One suspects that having two men who believe themselves to be the most powerful in the world can’t go well. Signs of trouble have already appeared.

Mosul Dam, A Bigger Problem Than ISIS?

Mosul Dam, A Bigger Problem Than ISIS?

 

On the morning of August 7, 2014, a team of fighters from the Islamic State, riding in pickup trucks and purloined American Humvees, swept out of the Iraqi village of Wana and headed for the Mosul Dam. Two months earlier, ISIS had captured Mosul, a city of nearly two million people, as part of a ruthless campaign to build a new caliphate in the Middle East. For an occupying force, the dam, twenty-five miles north of Mosul, was an appealing target: it regulates the flow of water to the city, and to millions of Iraqis who live along the Tigris. As the ISIS invaders approached, they could make out the dam’s four towers, standing over a wide, squat structure that looks like a brutalist mausoleum. Getting closer, they saw a retaining wall that spans the Tigris, rising three hundred and seventy feet from the riverbed and extending nearly two miles from embankment to embankment. Behind it, a reservoir eight miles long holds eleven billion cubic metres of water.

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

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HOW THE UPRIGHT CITIZENS BRIGADE IMPROVISED A COMEDY EMPIRE

HOW THE UPRIGHT CITIZENS BRIGADE IMPROVISED A COMEDY EMPIRE

Courtney “Coco” Mault

I thought that I had reached an age at which I could opt out of embarrassing myself in public, but last year, of my own free will, I did something mortifying. I took a series of eight improvisational-comedy classes with the Upright Citizens Brigade, which has, in the past two decades, developed into an empire with a cultural reach rivalling that of Deepak Chopra, say, or Kanye West. One Sunday morning, dressed to aerobicize (“You should be prepared to move around, lay on the ground and stretch in various positions,” an e-mail from U.C.B. advised), I arrived at an office building on Eighth Avenue and Thirty-seventh Street, and psyched myself up to learn how

Read the full article by Emma Allen here

Woody Allen on Café Society: ‘We buy $100 worth of lottery tickets a week’

This is the video interview:

Woody Allen, the writer and director of Café Society, a romantic comedy about a working class New Yorker (Jesse Eisenberg) seduced by the high life of 1930s Hollywood, talks to Catherine Shoard about his fascination with rich people and his 20-ticket-a-week lottery habit.

Here is the Woody Allen interview with Catherine Shoard:

Woody Allen is 80. Time is finite and he knows it. Every day the industrious same: wake, work, weights, treadmill, work, clarinet, work, supper, TV, sleep. Except today and tomorrow and Thursday, when he’ll do something futile.

“I never thought there was any point doing press,” he says. “I don’t think anybody ever reads an interview and says: ‘Hey, I want to see that movie!’” He smiles benignly, tip-to-toe in peanut-butter beige. Allen no longer reads anything about himself (except, maybe, one article, of which more later). This is the boring bit of film-making. This and the gags of the financiers.

Yet for someone who feels that way, he sure pulls the hours. At Cannes, he even carried on regardless of the publication of a piece by his son, Ronan Farrow, resurfacing an allegation of abuse by Allen of Ronan’s sister, Dylan. When I speak to him again three months later, in the final stages of prep on his 48th film (Kate Winslet, Justin Timberlake, 1950s, fairground), he’s friendly on the phone, in no special hurry to hang up.

Did Rousseau Predict the Likes of Donald Trump

Did Rousseau Predict the Likes of Donald Trump

HOW ROUSSEAU PREDICTED TRUMP

The Enlightenment philosopher’s attack on cosmopolitan élites now seems prophetic.

“I love the poorly educated,” Donald Trump said during a victory speech in February, and he has repeatedly taken aim at America’s élites and their “false song of globalism.” Voters in Britain, heeding Brexit campaigners’ calls to “take back control” of a country ostensibly threatened by uncontrolled immigration, “unelected élites,” and “experts,” have reversed fifty years of European integration. Other countries across Western Europe, as well as Israel, Russia, Poland, and Hungary, seethe with demagogic assertions of ethnic, religious, and national identity. In India, Hindu supremacists have adopted the conservative epithet “libtard” to channel righteous fury against liberal and secular élites*. The great eighteenth-century venture of a universal civilization harmonized by rational self-interest, commerce, luxury, arts, and science—the Enlightenment forged by Voltaire, Montesquieu, Adam Smith, and others—seems to have reached a turbulent anticlimax in a worldwide revolt against cosmopolitan modernity

Read more about Rousseau predicting the likes of Trump here

 

How Taxi Driver Ruined Acting


How Taxi Driver Ruined Acting
 

“Every day, for 40 fucking years, one of you has stopped me on the street and said, ‘You talkin’ to me?’” groused Robert De Niro at a recent Q&A at the Tribeca Film festival reuniting the makers of “Taxi Driver”. Martin Scorsese, Harvey Keitel, Jodie Foster, Cybil Shepherd and screenwriter Paul Schrader all swapped anecdotes, and De Niro led the audience in one last rendition of his most famous line, in an effort to expunge the ghost. He’s not the only one haunted by the role, which remains the template for every young Hollywood actor eager to put the lucre of blockbuster dollars behind them with a walk on the indie wild side: Christian Bale in “The Machinist”, Ryan Gosling in “Drive”, Sam Rockwell in “Seven Psychopaths”, in which he plays an actor who believes himself to be the illegitimate son of Travis Bickle. They all believe that. “‘Taxi Driver’ is the ultimate independent-movie performance,” Leonardo DiCaprio has said. “Playing a character like Travis Bickle is every young actor’s wet dream.”

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Hegel on Bastille Day

Hegel on Bastille Day

 

Hegel was no reactionary, and he had a special sympathy for the French Revolution

In July 1820, G. W. F. Hegel and his students arrived in Dresden to see some of the city’s art. The year was not an auspicious one for liberal or revolutionary circles.

Napoleon’s armies disbanded, Europe’s reactionary powers restored the old order through the Holy Alliance. With police spies snooping around, positive sentiments for the French Revolution and the ghosts of progress were seldom exhibited. Such sentiments were forced underground by reaction, and to even speak favorably about the revolution in public or in official circles would be near-lunacy. That’s why in the case of Hegel — someone described as a Prussian-state philosopher — the scene Terry Pinkard describes is remarkable.

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Wall Street Women: Harassed and Power-Hungry, as Depicted in Equity

Wall Street Women: Harassed and Power-Hungry, as Depicted in Equity

 

In an early scene in “Equity,” a new movie about women investment bankers, the protagonist, Naomi Bishop, delivers an address at her alma mater and describes how she became one of the top bankers for a firm that might be modelled after the former Bear Stearns. “I like money,” Bishop, played by Anna Gunn, tells the audience. “I’m not going to sit here and tell you that I only do what I do to take care of other people, because it is O.K. to do it for ourselves. For how it makes us feel. Secure? Yeah. Powerful? Absolutely.” She pauses, as if contemplating the political correctness of what she’s about to say: “I am so glad that it’s finally acceptable for women to sit and talk about ambition openly. But don’t let money be a dirty word. We can like that, too.”

See the rest of the story about Equity the film at newyorker.com

 

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